SBCC philosophy Courses & Degree

 
 

SCHEDULE of CLASSES: www.sbcc.edu/classes

Courses Regularly Offered

Philosophy courses do not require a prior Philosophy course, but taking a Philosophy course requires eligibility for ENG 100-103, except for PHIL 111, Critical Thinking and Writing which requires successful completion of ENG 110.

100-Introduction to Philosophy (3) CSU, UC
Skills Advisory: Eligibility for ENG 110.
Three hours lecture weekly. General survey of the basic problems and systems in philosophy. Special consideration given to Elementary Logic, Epistemology, Metaphysics, Ethics, Philosophy of Religion, Political Philosophy, Aesthetics.

101-Introduction to Ethics (3) CSU, UC
Skills Advisory: Eligibility for ENG 110.
Three hours lecture weekly. A study of the types and history of ethical theories. Analysis of the factual and normative factors involved in making moral choices. Discussion of the nature of moral standards and values and their relevance to present times. Some usual topics include the meaning of "should," "right," "justice", "blame", "responsibility". An examination of the moral aspect of social issues such as abortion euthanasia, the environment, drug legalization, etc.

102-Comparative World Religions (3) CSU, UC*
Skills Advisory: Eligibility for ENG 110.
Three hours lecture weekly. Presentation and interpretation of the fundamental concepts, ideals, customs, rituals and insights of the major religious traditions. Religions discussed Hinduism; Buddhism; Greek, Roman; Taoism; Confucianism; Shintoism; Jainism; Zoroastrianism; Sikhism; Judaism; Christianity; Islam. *(UC transfer limit: limited with 102HR to one course.)

102HR-Comparative World Religions, Honors (3) CSU, UC*
Skills Advisory: Eligibility for ENG 110.
Limitation on Enrollment: Acceptance into the Honors Program.
Three hours lecture weekly. In-depth presentation and interpretation of the fundamental concepts, ideals, customs, rituals and insights of the major religious traditions. Religions discussed: Hinduism; Buddhism; Greek, Roman; Taoism; Confucianism; Shintoism; Jainism; Zoroastrianism; Sikhism; Judaism; Christianity; Islam. *(UC transfer limit: limited with 102 to one course.)

111-Critical Thinking & Writing in Philosophy (3) CSU UC
Skills Advisory: Completion of ENG 110 with a course grade of "C" or better.
Three hours lecture weekly. Examination of the basic elements of logic, including the study of the principles of inductive and deductive reasoning, their relevance to problem solving, scientific method, and argument analysis/evaluation. Development/enhancement of critical thinking skills, including identifying and evaluating arguments, recognizing informal fallacies, and the uses and misuses of language in a variety of contexts. Integration of critical thinking skills with the techniques of effective argumentative writing, addressing themes of social and multicultural relevance.

200-History of Philosophy: Ancient & Medieval (3) CSU, UC
Skills Advisory: Eligibility for ENG 110.
Tree hours lecture weekly. Study of the thought of the major philosophers from the time of Thales (the founder of philosophy), 585. B.C. through the Medieval period. Philosophers discussed: the Presocratics; Sophists; Cyrenaics; Socrates; Plato; Aristotle; the Greek Atomists (Leucippus, Democritus, Epicurus); the Stoics; Plotinus and the Neo-Platonists; Augustine; Aquinas.

201-History of Philosophy: Modern (3) CSU, UC
Skills Advisory: Eligibility for ENG 110.
Three hours lecture weekly. Study of the thought of the major philosophers from the rise of science in the 1500s to early 19th century. Philosophers discussed: Descartes, Spinoza, Conway, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

203-History of Philosophy: Contemporary (3) CSU, UC
Skills Advisory: Eligibility for ENG 110.
Three hours lecture weekly. Philosophers of the l9th and 20th century are studied, showing their impact upon thought, culture, and society. Some of the philosophers presented in this course: Bertrand Russell; G. Frege; G.E. Moore; John Paul Sartre, L. Wittgenstein; Ayer; Ryle; Heidegger; Husserl; Rawls; Quine.

205-Introduction to Logic (3) CSU, UC
Skills Advisory: Eligibility for ENG 110.
Three hours lecture weekly. An investigation into the nature of argument. Such topics as justification, induction, deduction, validity, language and thought, formal and informal fallacies are discussed. Includes an introduction to traditional categorical logic, and the Propositional Calculus and Quantification Theory.

Associate of Arts Degree

A. A. Degree Requirements
The study of philosophy develops and refines a rigorous, analytic understanding of certain fundamental concepts, e.g., knowledge, reason, truth and value. Since all other disciplines in academia rely on the use of such concepts, the study of philosophy is essential for any education directed toward completeness.

The study of philosophy also yields other tangible academic benefits. It has been shown that philosophy students scored at least five percentage points above average in admission tests for professional and graduate schools in America. No other subject matches philosophy in this respect. Philosophy students do better in examinations for business and management school than anyone except mathematicians.

With employment opportunities beyond academia apparently growing, e.g., consultants to hospitals, state legislatures, Congress, genetic engineering firms and artificial intelligence companies, there has also been a proliferation of philosophical journals dealing with such topics as: the allocation of scarce medical resources, abortion, euthanasia, disposal of nuclear waste, corporate responsibility, fair profit, etc.

The Philosophy Department additionally provides an Introduction to Philosophy course which surveys most of the standard fields of philosophy-logic, epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, aesthetics, the philosophy of religion and political philosophy.

The other courses offered (Ethics, Logic, Comparative World Religions, History of Philosophy: Ancient, Modern and Contemporary, Issues in Philosophy) are more specific and detailed accounts of these fields.

These Philosophy courses may be transferred to four-year institutions. (Check for specifics with your Counselor)

PHIL 100-Introduction to Philosophy 3
PHIL 101-Ethics 3
PHL 111-Critical Think. & Writing in Phil. 3
PHIL 205-Logic 3

PLUS two courses selected from the following:

PHIL 200-History of Philosophy: Greek & Medieval 3
PHIL 201-History of Philosophy: Modern 3
PHIL 203-History of Philosophy: Contemporary 3

Total units: 15

Planning a Program of Study
The required Philosophy courses for majors may be taken in any order, but it is recommended that Introduction to Philosophy be taken as a prelude to the other courses.

Preparation for Transfer
Course requirements for transfer vary depending upon the college or university a student wishes to attend. Therefore, it is most important for a student to consult with his/her counselor and departmental adviser before planning an academic program for transfer. Information sheets for majors, outlining transfer requirements, are available in the Counseling Center and Transfer Center.

Honors & Awards
The Philosophy Department selects one student as Outstanding Student who is presented the Philosophy Award at the annual year-end Santa Barbara City College Awards Banquet. No application for the award is required of students.

Special Programs
Housed within the Department of Philosophy is the Center for Philosophical Education. CPE serves primarily two functions. First, CPE publishes the international undergraduate journal of philosophy, STOA. STOA is published twice a year and features outstanding faculty-nominated undergraduate papers from around the world. Second, CPE organizes international conferences in philosophy which are held on the SBCC campus. Hosting groups of outstanding philosophers from United States and Europe, for multiple-day events, CPE provides, through its conference offerings, unique and enriching professional academic experiences for both philosophy students as well as the greater Santa Barbara community. Please contact the Philosophy Department for CPE or STOA information.

The Philosophy Department also sponsors the Peter A. Angeles Colloquia, a year long, campus-wide series of lectures-discussions involving scholars, politicians and entertainers of national and international stature. The lectures are traditionally held in the Garvin Theater and occur typically once a month. Previous lectures can be seen on videotape in the LRC.

The Philosophy Department also sponsors a Philosophy Club. Any students interested in the study of philosophy are encouraged to join. Officers are elected in the fall, and a yearlong agenda of speakers and meetings is developed by the membership. All members of the campus community are welcome.